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ENTERTAINMENT MARTIAL-ARTS 40.5 Inch Japanese Officer Katana Sword with White Scabbard Review
 

40.5 Inch Japanese Officer Katana Sword with White Scabbard Review

By: Brian Garvin &... | May 27 2010 | 446 words | 90 hits

Hobbyists and collectors find the 40.5 inch Japanese Officer Katana sword with white scabbard  one of the most interesting and attractive swords available on the market. Its elegance and craftsmanship is definitely capable of instilling admiration in any observer.

The 40.5" Japanese Officer Katana Sword with White Scabbard evolved from the Katana sword, a weapon that played a vital role in the history of Japan. The Katana sword is actually the basis of all succeeding swords made in Japan, making it one of the most sought after weapons now.

The 40.5" Japanese Officer Katana Sword with White Scabbard is different since its scabbard is white in color. This makes it different from traditional Katana swords, creating a standout weapon that is sure to impress anyone. The price range for this Katana sword ranges from $40 to $60, quite affordable for its beauty and rich history.

Make sure that you know the characteristics of the Katana sword before you go ahead and buy the first item that you see online. Take note that the Katana sword is characterized by having a single edge and curved blade. Shop carefully for the best Japanese Officer Katana sword with white scabbard. The handle should look like genuine ivory.

The 40.5" Japanese Officer Katana Sword with White Scabbard is made from a combination of high and low carbon steel which has its own advantages and drawbacks. Although high carbon steel is harder and has sharper edge, it is malleable, thus increasing absorption impacts that make the sword blunter. Generally, the process of making Katana sword is a laborious. The sword undergoes several processes to make it sturdier.

The first famous Japanese sword, the nihonto began during the feudal period when the daimyo became famous in late 14th century Japan. Between the 14th and 15th century, the blade varied in length from around 27.6" to 28.7". In the early 16th century, the standard length was 23.6" until becoming 28.7" in the latter part of the century.

Traditionally, a Katana sword is paired with Wakizashi, a shorter sword. Daisho is a pair of Katana and Wakizashi that represent social power and the personal honor of the samurai. The word Katana is actually a word borrowed from the Portuguese language which means large knife.

These swords require maintenance in order to avoid irreparable damage. It is vital that the blade is frequently polished and well-oiled to maintain its original state. Rust or mold must also be taken care of without delay. But most importantly, proper handling should be done to avoid injury.

A 40.5" Japanese Officer Katana Sword with White Scabbard is a unique sword and scabbard which is a good gift for any sword lover and as decorative item for the home.


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Let Brian Garvin & Jeff West teach you more about the Katana Sword and the 40.5 Inch Japanese Officer Katana Sword on our website today.
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